Sunday, September 22, 2013

Graphing Polynomials Project


At the beginning of my second unit with my Trig kids, I had quickly gone through a graphing lesson when I had to leave them for two days for a training. The first day, I gave the kids a graphing project broken into two parts inspired by projects I've seen on pinterest. The first part of the project was a group portion so that the kids could collaborate before doing the project on their own.

One inspiration gave me the birthday component which I then added into the group requirements.
Another inspiration (Infinite Sums) gave me the paragraph portion as well as the graphs of the polynomials.

Combined, it was the perfect sub plan and gave the kids something to show me when I returned. Of course, the kids who chose to do nothing made it very obvious for me so that it was even easier to grade.

Graphing Polynomials Project

Part 1:

The first part of your graphing assignment will be in groups of 3 – 4. As a group, you will create a poster illustrating your newfound knowledge of graphing polynomials. Your posters will need to illustrate a few pieces of information highlighted in the form of a written paragraph (see below). Each group will choose 5 polynomials to describe.  For a sixth polynomial, you will create your own groups’ polynomial using your birth months’ numbers as the coefficients. Not only will you need to complete the informational paragraph for this polynomial, but you will also need to graph the polynomial by hand.

My graph is a ____ degree polynomial with end behavior that behaves such that _______________________________. It has solutions at ________. A possible equation for it is _______. It has ____ minimums and ____ maximums. It’s domain is _________________ while an approximate range is ________________.
Posters will be collected by the end of the period and they are expected to be complete and colorful.

Part 2:

The second part of your graphing assignment will be a solo project where you create your personal birthday polynomial. Use the digits of the month, day and 4 digit year of your birth – in order – as the coefficients of the polynomial. (For example: If your birthday is August 13, 1991, then use the digits 8131991 in that order) The degree of your polynomial must be a whole number greater than 2 and less than 6. (Ex. f(x)=8x5 1x4 3x3 +19x2 9x+1) Change the signs of the coefficients to make the most interesting graph you can – one that in some way reflects you.
You will then need to analyze the polynomial by finding the following: 1) domain and range 2) the degree
3) all of the zeros [estimate these using a graphing calculator] 4) describe the end behavior 5) the relative extrema [estimate these using a graphing calculator]
Lastly, you must make a Presentation of Your Birthday Polynomial on either a nice piece of paper or poster. Be creative and original. How does the graph of this polynomial reflect who you are? Present your birthday polynomial neatly, accurately and artistically. 
A written analysis (in paragraph form such as in Part 1) of your polynomial will be turned in with the visual.

The results......












7 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  2. YOU ARE SO AWESOME! Thanks for these wonderful ideas. I know that you are a blessing to your students! Thanks for some inspiration and motivation to make my high school math classroom a more exciting learning environment!!!!

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    Replies
    1. Oh my goodness, don't you make me feel special! Don't forget to check out the updated graphing polynomials project where the kids design a water park!

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    2. http://secondarymissrudolph.blogspot.com/2014/04/graphing-polynomial-project-water-park.html

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  3. In Part 1, did students choose polynomials to graph, or did you give them 5 polynomials to graph? Thanks for sharing your projects, love them all!!

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  4. My teacher has given my class this project.

    Why
    Why did you do this to me?

    ReplyDelete

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